Did you know that Waterstones has got a loyalty card?

Until recently I thought that the only Waterstones loyalty programme was their stamp card, where 10 stamps get you a free book worth £10. I admit it has never been as easy as filling up a coffee card, but I’ve managed to get two books for free over the last 6 years.

However this is not Waterstones only loyalty programme. In fact if you count the student programme, there are two additional ways of saving money and getting books for free.

waterstones card books

Before you start worrying about the weight of your wallet, let me give you the good news. You don’t need to add another physical card to your wallet. Waterstones’ loyalty programme comes with an app that replaces the plastic card and helps you keep track of your points.

How does the programme work?

It’s simple:

  • For every £1 you spend in store you receive 3 points
  • Every point has a cash value of 1p
  • Points can be used as part or full payment

Do I need to get rid of my stamp card?

You can and should keep your stamp card. Even if you collect points with your rewards card, you will still get a stamp for every £10 spent. Once you’ve filled a card with 10 stamps, you can get 1,000 points added to your card balance.

As the stamp card is only accepted in-store and not online, it’s worth making a visit to your local Waterstones store instead of to your laptop.

What benefits are there?

Members get bonus points on selected books as well as early access to signed books and limited editions.

They also get discounted tickets to literary events, a free upgrade to a large coffee in Waterstones stores with cafe and access to competitions including the chance to read and review books before they are published.

The full list of rewards is here.

Student Rewards

Students get even more with their Waterstones card. In addition to the core rewards, students collect 10 points for every £1 spent.

Each academic year the card has to be renewed in store by proving your student status via an ID.

Conclusion

If you are a book worm and prefer book stores to Amazon, it would be silly not to download the app or sign up online for the Waterstones loyalty programme.

As you can use as few or as many points as you like each time you pay for books, none of your points will go to waste.

If you love physical books and perks like early access to signed copies or discounted tickets to literary events, get yourself a Waterstones card.

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Comments

  1. sjhoward says:

    While the stamp card doesn’t work online, if you do an online “Reserve and Collect” (where they pull your book off the shelf and put it behind the till) you still get a stamp on your card as the transaction happens in store.

    This is useful if you have a few Waterstones branches nearby and want to prevent a wasted trip if they don’t have your chosen book in stock!

    However, you don’t get a stamp with orders paid for online and delivered to the store.

  2. Mark LLL says:

    Have shopped in Waterstones for years, never heard of their stamp card, though I do have their rewards card.

    Nostalgia Corner:

    I seem to remember, some years ago Waterstones offered additional ‘green’ points for bringing your own bag when buying books in store.

    Gaining reward points just for doing your bit to save the planet (Always assuming the trees used in book production had been of the sort which are sustainably grown)
    and so much nicer, in my view, than a plastic bag tax.

    I believe the Waterstones green points offer was quietly dropped a while back.
    Not that it seemed to make any difference to my own points balance: Rather frustratingly, I never could get any of these ‘Eco’ points – Shop staff would forget to credit them, or didn’t know how to add them to the transaction.